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Marx Figure Reviews | Allosaurus | Ankylosaurus | Brontosaurus | Cavemen | Cynognathus | Dimetrodon | Hadrosaurus | Iguanodon | Kronosaurus | Megatherium | Moschops | Parasaurolophus | Plateosaurus | Pteranodon | Smilodon | Sphenacodon | Stegosaurus | Struthiomimus | Styracosaurus | Trachodon | Triceratops | Tyrannosaurus (1) | Tyrannosaurus (2) | Woolly Mammoth

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Cynognathus is quite an unusual choice for a dino-line, but Marx included one in theirs (MPC copied it later). Cynognathus was not a dinosaur; it was a Triassic Therapsid, or "mammal-like reptile." Carnivorous and roughly the size of a wolf, Cynognathus' dog-like teeth helped to give it its name, "dog jaw." H.G. Seeley is to thank for naming this guy in 1876.
 
Cynognathus actually had a rather long, narrow skull, but for some reason the Marx figure has a stubby head; in fact, it's almost roundish. They didn't omit the teeth, but gave it a very lizardly appearance like the Cynognathus in Zallinger's mural. These days, Cynognathus is represented as looking much less reptile-like and more mammal-like--some folks even go so far as to give him hair (although it is not known whether he had hair/fur or not).
 
Though a successful creature, Cynognathus died out about the time the archosaurs came along. Some sources suggest that the climate became too arid for cynognathus.
 
The Marx Cynog is another of one of the 'cute looking' figures--he's not real fierce looking, though he was a top predator of his time. But he's still a nice addition to the line; Marx added a couple other figures in there that really aren't represented in other toy lines much, if at all.

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Korean stamp with Cynognathus, from 1991.

A cynognathus I made out of polymer clay.
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(Click to enlarge)

Cynognathus
 
Meaning: "Dog Jaw"
Length: up to 5'
Diet: Meat
Time Period: Early to Middle Triassic (245-230 m.y.a.)
Location: South Africa, Argentina, China

References
gg
Enchantedlearning.com: Cynognathus.
Illinois State Geological Survey: Cynognathus.